Monday, 18 May 2020

Madame Fiocca: The Remarkable True Story of Nancy Wake by Suzy Henderson

You would have thought I would be churning out the reviews during this covid time. The airport is closed and I won't be going to work until at least June. Wrong, I've done hardly any reading, as reading is my lunch time or beach pleasure. Well beaches are closed and well work and hence breaks have stopped. It's been a great oportunity to start and finish some big projects. Like decorating a flat etc. Also going from a very active job to staying at home required a rethinking of activities. As we were in lockdown, walks had to be short.
With the help of excersise videos and short walks I managed to keep the weight down and am probably fitter than before lockdown.
France has since reopened and I can now again enjoy walks with a friend at 2m distance, the beach is also open but only for a swim. (so reading will not pick up for now)
This book took a while to read, not because it was dull but because of the above. It was a gripping read I enjoyed while doing 20min workouts on the cross trainer.
I gave it 5 stars.


War brings out the best and worst in people, and some go above and beyond. The true story of Australian woman Nancy Wake is a remarkable one and Suzy Henderson tells it well. The story starts with the early days of Nancy’s career as a journalist and her tentative romance to Henri. Nancy’s married bliss is like so many people at that time interrupted by war.  She chooses however to make a stand against the German invasion. A remarkable story unfolds about her time in the resistance and with the SOE, training and supplying the maquis.
The writer has paid great attention to the life and times of Nancy Wake and I’m pleased she put in a comprehensive prologue about her life after the war until her death. The book reads like a gripping historic romance and war time daring do, so you forget this was all based on fact. The writer has done an amazing job of bringing this amazing woman to life for me by giving her a heart and a soul. Recommended for readers of historic non-fiction and fiction.                                        

No comments:

Post a comment